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Colossians 3:12-14 NKJV

“Put on tender mercies, kindness, humility, meekness, longsuffering; bearing with one another, and forgiving one another, if anyone has a complaint against another; even as Christ forgave you, so you also must do. But above all these things put on love, which is the bond of perfection.”

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A Walk with Purpose | Contemplations in essays, creative prose, and poetry | A Christian's perspective on life, written by someone who happens to be working to health from chronic illness | May your day be brighter and your dreams sweeter | © 2012-2019 Bernadette Saddik, RoomFullOfIdeas.com | All rights reserved. I am not an expert. All photos, writing, and anything else posted is my own unless otherwise stated. Please, if you would like to share, give credit to the author. The content on this site is not professional advice or analysis. Please note that your comments are subject to moderation. Thank you.

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“If” by Rudyard Kipling, 1895

“If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or, being hated, don’t give way to hating,
And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise;”

“If you can dream – and not make dreams your master;
If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with triumph and disaster
And treat those two imposters just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to broken,
And stoop and build ’em up with wornout tools;”

“If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breath a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: “Hold on”;”

“If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with kings – nor lose the common touch;
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you;
If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run –
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
And – which is more – you’ll be a Man my son!”

Kipling, Rudyard. N.p.: Paul Halsall, 1998. N. pag. Fordham University. Sourcebook. Web. 23 Jan. 2013. <http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/kipling-if.asp>. Rpt. of “If”. 1895.

Thank you to my teacher for AP 12th grade English and amazing theater director for introducing me to this poem back in high school. Your teachings continue to be a valuable asset as I go through life.

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Discussion (2 Comments)

  1. by Farida Haddad

    more than half a century ago i read this poem and loved it and still do – thanks for reminding me of these beautiful words written so long ago but still valid today and i think always

  2. You’re welcome! They are beautifully written words…they touch upon so many aspects of dealing with life.

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